Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

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Picture – From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.

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MINI-CASSIA - Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization that consists of ten members and their pets.

Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.

Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.

“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.

Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy volunteer group.

Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that was given to her as a gift.”

Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.

Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.

“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love people,” said Fletcher.

Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-Cassia area.

Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.

Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.

By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.

Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who canvolunteer during the day time.

For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at 436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.

Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.
For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at
436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Thank you for considering this for release. Please let me know if I can help further.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.Therapy Pets liven hospital hallways

MINI-CASSIA – Lexy, a miniature schnauzer dressed as a princess, and Little-bit, a miniature
poodle dressed as a prisoner, spent part of their Halloween night visiting patients at Cassia Regional
Medical Center. They are part of Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia (Therapy Pets), a local organization
that consists of ten members and their pets.
Therapy Pets visits schools, hospitals, nursing homes and any facilities where interaction with
pets would benefit people. Therapy pet team members allow people to pet, brush or just look at their
pets. They may ask permission to carefully place a small pet on a person’s lap or on their bed. They may
do simple tricks or obedience routines to entertain and to help people take their minds off their
problems. A person might walk alongside the dog and owner or throw toys for fetching games.
Therapy Pets tries to visit the hospital approximately twice per month. They make special visits
on holidays when some patients might be feeling especially lonely. For Valentine’s Day and Christmas,
Therapy Pets give out presents and a favorite gift is a photo album of all of the organization’s therapy
pets, which includes both dogs and cats.
“Typically we see patients who are on their second or third day at the hospital. They are stable
and getting anxious or bored and want to go home. Our job is to give them comfort and perhaps bring a
little fun to their stay,” said Lori Fletcher, Lexy’s owner and member of Therapy Pets.
Cassia Regional Medical Center pet owners must participate in the hospital volunteer program
and keep up on the training and education requirements for volunteering. They and their pets have
hospital badges. Lori Fletcher, Lori Kreider and Mick Hodges make up the hospital’s pet therapy
volunteer group.
Fletcher shared a favorite hospital pet therapy story, “I remember visiting patients at the
hospital one night and a woman we were visiting told us that she remembered Lexy visiting her on
Christmas Eve eight months prior. She said it meant a lot to her, and she still had the picture album that
was given to her as a gift.”
Another visit that really stood out in Fletcher’s mind was when she and Lexy were visiting a
patient who was dying. The patient’s daughter asked them to come in because her mom loved dogs.
Fletcher placed Lexy on the bed with the patient and Lexy gently rested her head on the patient’s hand
for awhile to give her comfort.
“You can train all dogs to have good behavior but the best therapy pets are the ones that love
people,” said Fletcher.
Lori Kreider, her daughter Cassie Douglas, and Lori Fletcher brought Pet Therapy to the Mini-
Cassia area. Kreider and her daughter had been practicing in Nebraska before they moved here ten
years ago and it took them some effort to educate facilities in the area about the benefits of pet
therapy. Cassia Regional was one of the first facilities to support the program.
Kreider described a good therapy pet as one that is at least one year old, remains calm around
distractions and other dogs, enjoys interaction with people, allows strangers to pet him, is at ease
around medical equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and canes, has been through obedience
training and listens to his handler. Handlers must be sure their pet is clean and healthy before visiting
people. Therapy pets are also registered, certified and insured.
By the time Lexy and Little-bit arrived at Cassia Regional Medical Center, they had already
visited two other facilities in the Mini-Cassia area and other members from their group were out visiting
six other facilities that night to spread cheer and happiness.
Some of the programs Therapy Pets are involved in include teaching responsible pet ownership
to children at the Cassia Juvenile Detention Center as a privilege program for good behavior. They also
help with a reading program at two local schools. Children who are nervous to read to an adult will read
to a dog because they are non-judgmental, so the program is very successful. The group recognizes a

need in the area to work with Speech Therapy patients for the same reason. Physical Therapy patients
would also benefit greatly by being able to achieve more mobility through petting the dogs or throwing
items for the dogs to fetch. There are not enough pet therapy teams to volunteer in those therapies
currently. Therapy Pets is looking for more pet teams to join their group, especially teams who can
volunteer during the day time.

For more information about Therapy Pets Serving Mini-Cassia, please contact Lori Fletcher at 436-6861 or Lori Kreider at 219-9327, or go to www.TherapyPetsServingMiniCassia.com.
Picture attached: From left: Lori Kreider with Little-bit, and Lori Fletcher with Lexy.

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